Heaven is for Real

“Heaven is for Real” is a faith-based family drama inspired by a Nebraska Pastor Tood Burpo’s best-selling book about his 4 years old son (Colton Burpo) who had visited heaven and describes his journey. His family is facing a financial difficulty and the young Burpo used by God.


The Spread of Christianiy

Christianity is currently the world's largest religion with over 2 billion followers. Beginning with the son of a Jewish carpenter, the religion was spread around the world first by Jesus's disciples, then by emperors, kings, and missionaries. Through crusades, conquests, and simple word of mouth, Christianity has had a profound influence on the last 2,000 years of world history.


Samson

The film begins with the narrator, Caleb, revealing that the Hebrews have been oppressed by the cruel Philistines for not following God’s covenant. Caleb’s older brother Samson is under a Nazirite covenant with God to deliver the Israelites from oppression. Despite this, Samson likes riddles and fighting pits instead of taking this seriously. However, this message of hope reaches the ears of the Philistine king, Balek. He commands his son Rallah to investigate. Rallah bribes a Philistine lord to hold a fight in hopes of drawing Samson out. Samson arrives and bests the strongman, while noticing the lord’s daughter, Taren. Samson tracks her down and persuades her to spend time with him. However, Prince Rallah enslaves the lord and Taren.

Samson and Taren fall in love and desire marriage. Rallah’s concubine Delilah convinces Rallah to allow the marriage to better control Samson. At the wedding feast, Rallah tricks Samson into drinking wine, which is against his Nazirite vows. In response, Samson offers a riddle to Rallah and his guests, wagering 30 Philistine tunics. Unable to solve it, Rallah threatens Taren to find out the answer. Taren gets Samson to reveal it, but Delilah overhears, telling Rallah the answer. When Rallah declares the answer, Samson assumes Taren told him and storms off.

Samson arrives at a Philistine garrison, killing them all in self-defense. In order to take their tunics, he is forced to touch their dead bodies, breaking his second Nazirite vow. Upon returning, he finds that Rallah has married Taren in his place. Enraged, Samson finds foxes and attaches firebrands to them. He uses them to destroy the Philistine grain fields. Rallah then throws Taren and her father into the burning fields, killing them. Defeated, Samson flees to a cave.

The Philistines arrive at Samson’s village and capture his father Manoah, demanding that Samson be surrendered to them. Despite Samson’s surrender, Rallah promises to burn the village anyway and has Manoah executed. As he gives the order to kill Samson, Samson prays to God for strength. Samson slays 1,000 Philistines with the jawbone of a donkey, while Rallah barely survives.

Samson is anointed Judge. However, the Philistines withhold food from the Hebrews. Samson goes to the Philistine capital to offer terms of peace with Balek. When Balek rejects the offer, Rallah decides to use Delilah to discover Samson’s weakness, coveting the power Samson’s God has. Before Samson can leave the city, he is tricked into visiting a brothel, where he meets Delilah. Delilah warns his life is in danger: the city has discovered his presence. Delilah helps Samson escape, and the two agree to meet in Delilah’s home. Later, the two begin to fall in love.

Samson’s absence agitates the Hebrews into trying to rebel. Some Hebrews who disapprove of this plan inform Rallah, who moves to capture Samson. When Caleb discovers this, he hurries to protect Samson. Meanwhile, Samson and Delilah dream of running away and touring the world. Flightily, Delilah asks what could bind him. Samson reveals that by cutting his hair, he would break his last Nazirite vow and lose his strength. As Delilah cuts Samson’s hair, Rallah and his forces arrive. Samson, now powerless, is captured. Caleb arrives to fight them but is also captured. Rallah blinds Samson and imprisons the brothers. Rallah parades this achievement to Balek, who urges Samson to be killed. However, Rallah wants to use him as an object lesson to their enemies. In their shouting match, Rallah kills Balek and seizes the crown. Delilah comes to the dungeon with bail money to free Samson as penance, but he tells her to use it to free Caleb, which she does. Samson declares he is done following his own desires instead of God’s and tells Caleb to prepare the Hebrews to capture the city.

King Rallah decides to make sport of Samson when he learns that he can never gain the power of Samson’s God. Samson is taken to the temple of Dagon and abused by the Philistines. Caleb enters the temple to monitor Samson, while Delilah also attends out of remorse. Samson prays once more for God’s strength and pushes the two main pillars of the temple. As the building and Dagon’s statue collapses, Samson, Rallah and Delilah are killed, but Caleb escapes and rallies the Hebrews. In a narration, Caleb relates how the Hebrews had been reawakened by Samson and were ready to resist the Philistines. The final scene shows a young boy rising up to fight a Philistine giant, becoming God’s chosen King over Israel.


1929 Stock Market Crash

What Was the Stock Market Crash Of 1929?

The Stock Market Crash of 1929 began on October 24. While it is remembered for the panic selling in the first week, the largest falls occurred in the following two years. The Dow Jones Industrial Average did not bottom out until July 8, 1932, by which time it had fallen 89% from its September 1929 peak, making it the biggest bear market in Wall Street’s history. The Dow Jones did not return to its 1929 high until November 1954.

Stock Market Crash Of 1929 Explained

The stock market crash of 1929 followed a bull market which had seen the Dow Jones rise 400% in five years. But with industrial companies trading at price-earnings ratios of 15, valuations did not appear unreasonable after a decade of record productivity growth in manufacturing – that is until you take into account the public utility holding companies.

By 1929, thousands of electricity companies had been consolidated into holding companies which were themselves owned by other holding companies, which controlled about two-thirds of American industry. Ten layers separated the top and bottom of some of these complex highly leveraged pyramids. As the Federal Trade Commission reported in 1928, the unfair practices these holding companies were involved in — like bilking subsidiaries through service contracts and fraudulent accounting involving depreciation and inflated property values — were a “menace to the investor."

The Federal Reserve's decision to reign in speculation, because it was diverting resources from productive uses, and raised the rediscount rate to 6% from 5% in August, was an accident waiting to happen. However, the straw that broke the camel’s back was probably the news, in October 1929, that the public utility holding companies would be regulated. The resulting sell-off cascaded through the system, as investors who had bought stocks on margin became forced sellers.

Instead of trying to stabilize the financial system, the Fed, thinking the crash was necessary or even desirable, did nothing to prevent the wave of bank failures that paralyzed the financial system – and so made the slump worse than it might have been. As Treasury Secretary Andrew Mellon told President Herbert Hoover: "Liquidate labor, liquidate stocks, liquidate the farmers, liquidate real estate … It’ll purge the rottenness out of the system."

The crash was exacerbated by the collapse of a parallel boom in foreign bonds. Because the demand for American exports had been propped up by the huge sums lent to overseas borrowers, this vendor-financed demand for American goods disappeared overnight.

But the market did not drop steadily. In early 1930, it rebounded briefly by about 50% — in what would be a classic dead cat bounce – before collapsing again. In the end, a quarter of America’s working population would lose their jobs, as the Great Depression ushered in an era of isolationism, protectionism and nationalism. The infamous Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act in 1930 started a spiral of beggar-thy-neighbor economic policies.

Because the lack of government oversight was one of the major causes of the 1929 crash – thanks to laissez faire economic theories – Congress would pass important Federal regulations, including the Glass Steagall Act of 1933, the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, and the Public Utility Holding Companies Act of 1935.


Shannon Bream

WASHINGTON – She's a bright and shining star on Fox News and in her first book, Finding the Bright Side, Shannon Bream opens up about her life, faith, and some of the ups and downs she's experienced along the way.

Just like many of her guests on Fox News @ Night, Shannon is consistently in the middle of the action with what many would call a dream job.

"I love what I do," she told CBN News. "It feels like a huge blessing and a gift."

Shannon sat down with CBN's Jenna Browder at the Museum of the Bible to talk about her book and how she got to where she is today.

She grew up in Florida going to church and Christian school, eventually choosing Liberty University for college. That's where she met her husband, Sheldon Bream.

"We had friends who kept trying to put us together," Shannon explained. "We were always dating other people and we had a friend in common who finally came to me one day and she said, 'You're here at this football game. He's here at this football game. You're going to meet right now.'"

Beauty Pageants and Law School

While at Liberty, Shannon took the crown as Miss Virginia. She went on to law school at Florida State University and more pageantry, winning the Miss Florida title.

It was around this time Sheldon proposed but not long after their engagement, Shannon writes about what she calls, "The Darkest Cloud," when doctors diagnosed Sheldon with a brain tumor.

 A Shocking Diagnosis

"To be 24 – and we were engaged and planning our life together – and to get those words, to get that news, it's totally out of left field and so unexpected," said Shannon.

The church was a huge support, from diagnosis and surgery to Sheldon's difficult recovery.

"We would get letters and notes or calls from people, from churches we'd never heard of, never visited, didn't know anyone there but they said, 'We heard about your story and we just wanted to let you know that we're praying for you,'" Shannon tearfully recalled. "As a Christian, it was just so overwhelming to know that there were people who were just the body of Christ that we would never meet."

Newly married and out of school, Shannon learned quickly law wasn't for her and started interning at a local news station.

"I eventually decided a few months into that I loved it so much – the police scanners and the breaking news and just the unpredictability of live television – that I decided to kind of take the leap."

The Road to Fox News

She eventually got hired at the CBS affiliate in Charlotte, North Carolina. After a short stint there, NBC in Washington, DC picked her up. It was at a speaking conference where she met Fox News' Britt Hume who offered her a job when he learned about her legal background.

It didn't take long for Shannon to begin moving up at Fox, filling in on the anchor desk and eventually getting her own show.

Excruciating Pain Made Her Feel Like Life Was Over

One major trial she's had to deal with is a painful disease that affects her eyes.

"Around my 40th birthday, I started to have extraordinary pain in my eyes and it was only happening overnight and I couldn't figure out what the source was of this but it would literally shoot me out of bed in enormous pain, doubled over," Shannon explained.

The excruciating pain went on for almost two years before a doctor was able to diagnose her, though he told her there would be no cure.

"I just sat there crying in my car and just saying to the Lord, 'This is it. This is the end for me. There's nothing else I can do,'" Shannon said. "And I explain in the book how I'm not someone whoever feels like I've audibly heard the voice of God but I felt in my spirit and I heard Him say to me in that moment, 'I will be with you.' Not, 'I'm going to heal you. I'm going to take this away. You're never going to have this pain again.' Just, 'I will be with you.' And I felt like that promise sustained me and I knew it was true. I knew His presence would be with me despite the fact that there was no cure."

With that same doctor, Shannon was able to manage the pain and eventually underwent surgery. Today she says her eyes aren't perfect but they're about "95 percent better."

The Decision to Remain Childless

One reoccurring question Shannon says she gets, especially in Christian circles, is about her decision to not have kids. She says she knew early on she didn't have what she calls "Mom Genes."

"The Lord creates us all in different ways and gives us all different passions and different paths," she said, adding that she has many young people in her life but feels her true calling is her career.

As for what's next, she's not sure but is keeping an open mind and heart.

"I try to say to myself, this is the season that the Lord has you here. Don't hold too tightly to it because you don't know what other adventures or things are coming down the line and I just try to be open to what the Lord may have next."